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How to improve ankle stability

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We are often asked “how to improve ankle stability” and so we have decided to put together this really helpful guide on?how to improve ankle stability and outline some simple exercises to help improve ankle stability. Let us know how you get on and if you need more advice on?how to improve ankle stability then please contact us.

 

The Importance of Ankle Stability and how to improve ankle stability

 

Who is this article aimed at?

Anybody that may be concerned about their ankle stability and strength and wants to know how to improve ankle stability. This could be people involved in psychical activities that involve running, changing direction quickly and rapid acceleration/deceleration or otherwise carries the risk of ankle sprains. This article will tell you How to Rehabilitate Ankle Stability

Those that have already suffered an ankle sprain of some description may also find this article useful since ankle instability can continue even after a sprain has healed.

 

Why is ankle stability important?

Our bodies are supported by our ankles, they bear an incredible amount of weight and can be highly mobile. Despite this, they are surprisingly fragile and relatively easy to damage. Every single day, people are spraining their ankles either on the playing field, the track or just stepping off a curb.

Sprains are normally shrugged off because they are usually nothing to worry about and are nothing but a memory after a day or two. That isn?t always the case though, even when you think it is.

A study into Physical Activity Levels in College Students With Chronic Ankle Instability that was co-authored by Dr Hubbard-Turner, highlighted the long-term effects that a sprain can have on the ankle.

 

Is ankle stability linked to activity levels?

In the study conducted by Dr Hubbard-Turner, 40 students were monitored. 20 with previous ankle sprains, and 20 students who had not experienced an ankle sprain. It was observed that the students who had sprained an ankle in the past were far less active than those who hadn?t.

This drop in activity levels is attributed to the instability of the previously sprained ankle, which led to the joint becoming fragile and more likely to give way during movement.

Looking at pedometer results it was also noted that the 20 students with previously sprained ankles took around 2,000 fewer steps than the students who had not.

 

Treatment of ankle sprains

Looking at the results of studies like this one, it?s easy to see why ankle sprains should be taken more seriously by those it happens to – especially if your livelihood depends on high levels of physical activity.

Exercises that are specifically designed to help strengthen the ankle are a good idea if you are usually very active, and if you have sprained your ankle previously then they can help improve ankle stability by showing you?how to improve ankle stability.

 

Exercising ankle stabilising muscles

Anybody who is physically active will be able to appreciate why ankle (and foot) stability is important. You are more likely to have trouble keeping your balance and maintaining correct posture – both of which can not only affect performance but also lead to injury.

Conditions like shin splints and plantar fasciitis (heel pain) also become more common. There are lots of different exercises to choose from that target the stabilisers of the feet and ankles, and they are simple enough to work through just about anywhere.

If you are currently recovering from a sprain, however, you should speak to your health professional first to be sure a specific exercise doesn?t hamper your recovery. Exercises designed to improve ankle stability and strength

 

How to improve ankle stability

By Marsh Fernando, BSc (Hons) Sports Therapist

 

Proprioception/ Balance

  • Supine AROM – Proprio ankle alphabet –

Lay on your back with the injured leg straightened. Now lift off your ankle off the ground and then try writing the letters of the alphabet by sing your ankle joint movement alone. ??

  • Unipodal/single leg stance with eyes open -?

Stand next to a chair, and try to balance yourself on one foot. Try not to hinge yourself through the hip, Instead, let the ankle correct your position. Aim for 10 seconds.

  • Alphabet-standing –

In standing place your injured foot on top of a ball (medicine ball, football). Now try to balance yourself and at the same time try to create the letters of the alphabet using the ball and the movement of your ankle joint.

  • Unipodal/single leg stance eyes closed -?

Stand next to a chair, and try to balance yourself on one foot, then close your eyes. Try not to hinge yourself through the hip, Instead, let the ankle correct your position. Aim for 10 seconds

  • Standing on trampoline, Unipodal/single leg stance with eyes closed -?

The aim of this exercise is to introduce uneven surface to balance training. Stand on a trampoline with one foot and try to aim to keep your balance for 10 seconds.

  • Single leg balance, trunk rotation with arms in front -?

Stand on one leg with. Place your hands front, with your hands together. ?Rotate the trunk to each side while keeping your balance and the body stable. To increase the intensity of the exercise simply increase the speed.

  • Single leg balance, horizontal arm movements –

Stand on one leg with both arms by your side. Lift one arm in front of you and one on the side. Alternate the position of your arms while keeping your balance. To increase the intensity of the exercise simply increase the speed.

  • Single leg balance, alternate arm flexion, and extension -?

Stand on one leg. Lift one arm above your head and the other by your side. Alternate the position of your arms while keeping your balance. To increase the intensity of the exercise simply increase the speed.

  • Single leg balance while throwing a ball on the wall –

Stand close to a wall with a ball on your hand. Now stand on?one foot and try to throw the ball onto the wall and try catching the rebound. You can increase the distance covered as you progress through the exercise.

  • Double leg balance on Air Pad –

The aim of this exercise is to introduce uneven surface to balance training. Stand on an Air pad in a comfortable stance and try to aim to keep your balance for 10 seconds.

  • Proprioception/balance on board (2 feet) -?

The aim of this exercise is to introduce uneven surface to balance training. Stand on a balance board in a comfortable stance and try to aim to keep your balance for 10 seconds.

  • Standing proprioception cone touches (3 points) -?

Place 2 cones either side of you and 12 cones in front and behind you. Now stand in the middle of the cone circle. Then balance yourself on the injured foot, and then try to reach each cone with your toes. Make sure not to hinge yourself from the hip. Once one side is completed try the opposite side with the opposite leg.

  • DL balance on Bosu -?

The aim of this exercise is to introduce uneven surface to balance training. Stand on a bosu ball in a comfortable stance and try to aim to keep your balance for 10 seconds.

  • Bosu Balance Double Toes –

The aim of this exercise is to introduce uneven surface to balance training. Stand on a bosu ball in a comfortable stance and then go on to your tip toes by raising your heels. Now try to aim to keep your balance for 10 seconds.

  • Ankle active ROM in weight bearing on round balance board –

Stand on a round balance board and turn the board in each direction to mobilize your ankles. Hold a stable object if needed for support

  • Single leg balance on Air Pad –

The aim of this exercise is to introduce uneven surface to balance training. Stand on an Air pad with one foot and try to aim to keep your balance for 10 seconds.

  • Proprioception / balance on board (1 foot) –

The aim of this exercise is to introduce uneven surface to balance training. Stand on a balance board with one foot and try to aim to keep your balance for 10 seconds.

  • Bosu Standing On 1 Foot / Stabilization –

The aim of this exercise is to introduce uneven surface to balance training. Stand on a Bosu with one foot and try to aim to keep your balance for 10 seconds.

  • Bosu Balance Single toe -?

The aim of this exercise is to introduce uneven surface to balance training. Stand on one foot on a bosu ball in a comfortable stance and then go on to your tip toes by raising your heels. Now try to aim to keep your balance for 10 seconds.

  • Bosu DL Squat -?

The aim of this exercise is to introduce uneven surface to balance training. Stand on a bosu ball in a comfortable stance. Whilst keeping your balance, try to perform a front squat by pushing your bottom out and lowering it towards the floor.

  • Bosu Sl Squat –

The aim of this exercise is to introduce uneven surface to balance training. Stand on a bosu ball on one foot in a comfortable stance. Whilst keeping your balance, try to perform a single leg front squat by pushing your bottom out and lowering it towards the floor.

  • Balance And Squat Double Toe Bosu -?

The aim of this exercise is to introduce uneven surface to balance training. Stand on a bosu ball in a comfortable stance, then go on to your tip toes by raising your heels. Now try to perform a front squat by pushing your bottom out and lowering it towards the floor.

  • Balance And Squat Single Toe Bosu –

The aim of this exercise is to introduce uneven surface to balance training. Stand on a bosu ball on one foot in a comfortable stance, then go on to your tip toes by raising your heel. Now try to perform a single leg front squat by pushing your bottom out and lowering it towards the floor.

  • Jogging on the spot on trampoline -?

Stand on a trampoline (stay close to an object for balance if needed). Run on the spot while keeping your balance.

How to improve ankle stability and how to set the number of exercises

To find out more about how to improve ankle stability and how many of each of these exercises I should be doing based on my condition then you can use this as a rough guide to finding out more about how to know this.

How to plan exercises, sets, reps and rest intervals

At this stage, you need to be thinking about visiting someone who can assess your condition and diagnose it properly to ensure you categorise your condition correctly and then you can apply the correct type of exercises for this.

For more information about?How to Rehabilitate Ankle Stability

If you would like additional information about how to improve ankle stability?or to discuss how we may be able to help with your queries please contact us using the form below and we will get back to you as soon as possible.

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Perfect Balance Clinic accepts no responsibility for self-prescribed exercises. The information contained in this article or any others on this website should not be used in isolation to self-manage conditions but are provided for reference only to accompany a specialist managing your condition specifically and a review of the current advice surrounding each condition.

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